RIKEN

Author Archive: RIKEN

RIKEN is Japan's largest comprehensive research institution renowned for high-quality research in a diverse range of scientific disciplines. Founded in 1917 as a private research foundation in Tokyo, RIKEN has grown rapidly in size and scope, today encompassing a network of world-class research centers and institutes across Japan.

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Sugar element of keratan sulfate halts the progress of emphysema

Sugar element of keratan sulfate halts the progress of emphysema

Using a mouse model, scientists from the RIKEN-Max Planck Joint Research Center for Systems Chemical Biology and a number of other institutes have identified a sugar molecule that reduced the inflammatory response and progress of emphysema, a common component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). According to Naoyuki Taniguchi, the leader of the group, this […]

By May 13, 2017 0 Comments Read More →
Positive and negative memories and behaviors are split up in the brains of mice

Positive and negative memories and behaviors are split up in the brains of mice

Like broccoli and ice cream on a toddler’s plate, the brain also keeps nice and nasty information in separate places. Within the amygdala, an important memory center in the brain, pleasant experiences, tastes, and smells are confined to the back of the basolateral nucleus (BLA), while unpleasant ones are stored at the front. These anterior […]

By October 25, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Locating social memories in the brain: Haven’t I seen you someplace before?

Locating social memories in the brain: Haven’t I seen you someplace before?

Research at the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics has identified where social memories are located in the brain. Published in the journal Science, the study shows that memories of social encounters are stored in a specific brain circuit that includes the ventral hippocampus, and that they remain in the brain even after mice can […]

By October 2, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Current atmospheric models underestimate the dirtiness of Arctic air

Current atmospheric models underestimate the dirtiness of Arctic air

Black carbon aerosols—particles of carbon that rise into the atmosphere when biomass, agricultural waste, and fossil fuels are burned in an incomplete way—are important for understanding climate change, as they absorb sunlight, leading to higher atmospheric temperatures, and can also coat Arctic snow with a darker layer, reducing its reflectivity and leading to increased melting. […]

By May 31, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Brain calcium controls how long we sleep

Brain calcium controls how long we sleep

We know calcium is good for our bones, but it might also be the key to a good night sleep. Researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center (QBiC) and the University of Tokyo in Japan have unveiled a new theory for how sleep works. Published in the journal Neuron, the work shows how slow-wave sleep […]

By March 28, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Flipping a light switch recovers memories lost to Alzheimer’s disease mice

Flipping a light switch recovers memories lost to Alzheimer’s disease mice

Light stimulation of brain cells can recover memories in mice with Alzheimer’s disease-like memory loss, according to new research from the RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics. The rescue of memories, which changed both the structure of neurons as well as the behavior of mice, was achieved using optogenetics, a method for manipulating genetically tagged […]

By March 28, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
Jawless fish brains more similar to ours than previously thought

Jawless fish brains more similar to ours than previously thought

Researchers at the RIKEN Evolutionary Morphology laboratory and other institutions in Japan have shown that complex divisions in the vertebrate brain first appeared before the evolution of jaws, more than 500 million years ago. Published in Nature, the study shows that two elements of brain genoarchitecture thought to be unique to jawed vertebrates are actually […]

By February 27, 2016 0 Comments Read More →
New insights into REM sleep crack an enduring mystery

New insights into REM sleep crack an enduring mystery

REM sleep—the phase of night-time mammalian sleep physiology where dreams occur—has long fascinated scientists, clinicians, philosophers, and artists alike, but the identity of the neurons that control REM sleep, and its function in sleep have been controversial due to a lack of precise genetic methods to study the sleeping brain. Now, in a remarkable demonstration […]

By December 3, 2015 0 Comments Read More →
First mouse model of spontaneous depression-like episodes reveals new candidate brain region

First mouse model of spontaneous depression-like episodes reveals new candidate brain region

Scientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute have shown that a mouse strain with a mutation that leads to dysfunction of mitochondria—the “powerhouses” that provide energy to cells—spontaneously undergo periodic episodes of depression-like behavior that resemble those in human. Through this research, published in Molecular Psychiatry, the scientists uncovered a link between depression and the […]

By December 3, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

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